A Guide For Rubio Long Snapping Parents on Game Day

As season starts, parents can tend to be filled with tons of emotions: joy, excitement, fear, nervousness, etc. All are normal and should be felt if your son is going to play on Friday, Saturday or even Sunday. Here are a couple of things to remember….

  1. You aren’t the first parent to go through this and you won’t be the last. Just like I tell my Long Snappers, if someone else has done it, so can you.
  2. Know that your son is well prepared. Odds are, if you are reading this, your son has been to a Rubio Long Snapping camp in the past couple months and got great instruction. Not only did he, but you did so as well. Remember when I brought you on the field? I don’t do that just because I want to spray with some people closer to my age. I do it so you can learn and teach your son when I am not around….and you have been doing that, right:)
  3. Review the mental aspect with your son before the game. Remind him, and yourself, that he, and you, are ready for this and he, and you, will dominate the moment.
  4. Make sure you hire someone else to film the game (one of your son’s friends or something….”Hey Johnny, here’s ten bucks, film the whole game, do it well, keep the camera on the Long Snapper and keep quiet”) so you can focus on the whole experience and not be stuck behind a camera seeing the game through a three inch screen.
  5. Prepare for the game with your son. After he snaps a great ball, you will want to give him signals to show him how great he did…thumbs up, big outstretched arms emulating a Rubio hug, blow him a kiss (get his lady friends involved).

Breathe. Have fun. Believe in your son. Have confidence in him. Trust me, it will overflow into him.

Enjoy every single moment you have with your children. This is an incredible time in your life and you need to embrace every single second of it.

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Chris-Rubio-2Rubio Long Snapping is, by far, the biggest and best resource for Long Snappers in the country. Offering the best instruction and most exposure in the world. Rubio Long Snapping can help you to become the best snapper you can be!

In just 12 years,  Chris Rubio, President and Owner of Rubio Long Snapping, has become the #1 Long Snapping instructor in the country and the go-to man when a college coach needs a Long Snapper. Colleges from across the country rely on “Rubio’s” word day in and day out on who the best Long Snappers are in the country. Rubio Long Snapping has assisted in over 300 Long Snappers earning FULL SCHOLARSHIPS to major colleges and universities just for Long Snapping and many into the NFL as well.

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Survival Guide for Rubio Long Snapping Parents

A couple weeks ago, a Rubio Long Snapping mom named Ashely Culbertson asked if she could put together a survival guide for the parents. She stated that there is a ton that goes into being a parent at the camp and lots of stuff to be said. Given, I said “Let it rain!” and she did.

TREMENDOUS job by Ashely and definitely something to sit down and soak in.

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Survival Guide for Rubio Long Snapper/Chris Sailer Kicking Parents: 

Quick Reference for the BIG Questions to the Little Questions Most Parent/Guardians of LS and K/P have.

I’m just a mom. It sounds funny to say that out loud, as any parent knows being a parent is not for the faint of heart, so using the phrase “just a mom” is a HUGE understatement. Equally understated is to use the phrase “just the long snapper/kicker/punter.” So, go ahead and move past the “just” and recognize the vitally important role your son (or possibly daughter, but for the sake of time and space I’ll refer to the student athlete in the male form) plays on his team. Special teams, and specifically the long snapper and kicker/punter have, can, and will make or break a football game. I encourage you to go to www.chrissailerkicking.com and read more in depth blogs on this subject via the link to Rubio’s blog and Sailer’s blog. Another quick and extremely relevant example would be the 2014 college football season during which both regular season and bowl games had outcomes determined by the performance of special teams in the last few seconds. Now, moving forward, I’m just a mom and my kid’s just a long snapper, and the past year and a half has been one of the most exciting journeys…EVER…so buckle up buttercup, here we go!

Your First Rubio/Sailer Camp-

     1. This is typically the one day camp that is held closest to you. You probably googled long snapping or kicking instruction/technique, or heard of Rubio and/or Sailer by word of mouth, and now you’re all signed up for your first Rubio/Sailer Camp for your son. **Prepare to be blown away.** We were. My son had just finished his freshman season, having been pulled to the varsity team and become the starting long snapper for his high school football team. His high school is known for its football program in our state, and my son became a really big fish in a small pond literally overnight. He loved it. We, his parents, thought he was the best thing that had ever happened to long snapping. Once we got to that first camp, the “pond” suddenly got much, much bigger. That’s not to say my son wasn’t good, what I mean is we saw very quickly that if he wanted to get serious about football and college, there was work to be done.

          -This may or may not be your experience and that’s okay. Every situation is unique, and it’s important to take the suggestions that help.

          -You are going to be given A LOT of information. Relax! (You’ll find this to be a recurring theme throughout this experience.) Give it time and it will sink in. Also, Sailer and Rubio are two of the most open and receptive individuals/professionals when it comes to questions. A quick tip, though- after this first camp, when a question comes up, go to the website first. If you still can’t find an answer you are looking for, ask! 

     2. What do I need to take for camp?

Sounds a bit silly, but until you’ve been there, done that, (and now can even get the t-shirt), there are things I definitely would recommend having on hand that I never thought of in the beginning.

          -Wear comfortable clothes and shoes. You will be very involved in this experience and while I love my cute sandals and sundresses as much as the next mom (comfortable clothing applies to dads as well; choose clothes you’d wear when at home working with your son), this isn’t a beauty pageant. Get out your socks and tennis/running/athletic shoes, shorts, and a t-shirt and be ready to work and learn with your son.

          -Bring a chair, you’ll need to be in close proximity to the instruction. Usually that means on the sidelines until Sailer or Rubio call parents to the field. Standing all day or sitting on the grass/turf isn’t ideal.

          -If possible, bring a cooler with water. Water is ALWAYS provided, but if you’re at a camp in the heat of summer, a small cooler (even the soft, foldable ones) that can carry water bottles with ice/cold packs definitely comes in handy. Your athlete should be hydrating daily. The reality is, so should parents. If you or your athlete waits to take in water until thirsty, you’re doing it wrong. HYDRATE, HYDRATE, HYDRATE! If the camp isn’t close enough to drive to and you are flying, Google the nearest Dollar Store, Dollar General, WalMart, Target, etc. It’s worth the extra ten dollars to have cold water on hand. 

          -Sunscreen. You and your athlete will be outside (weather permitting) for the better part of eight hours. Even if the camp you and your athlete are attending is during one of the cooler months, you may need sunscreen. If it’s a summer camp and you enjoy having a nose, it’s a must.

          -You are going to have about an hour for lunch. Be prepared. Google restaurants close by that you can get in and out of quickly. Another option is bring lunch with you- think tailgating. This can be a good idea for several reasons: you don’t have to rush, your athlete has more time to relax and regroup, and you will likely have the opportunity to get to know others at the camp. It’s important to realize this group of young men will see each other again, and they are building friendships on the field, so build friendships with the parents around you. Be smart, though. If it’s 100* outside, go somewhere out of the heat for this break. Otherwise, I’m confident EMS will gladly take you somewhere cooler- just saying.

          -Bring your camera/phone. Rubio and Sailer are used to taking pictures with athletes at their camps at the end. Even if your kid isn’t big on pictures, DO IT. You’ll look back at some point and realize how far your kid has come, and you’ll be glad you did.

     3. Why does Rubio/Sailer know other kids’ names/parents/families? Will they remember my son? Are they even watching them?

          -Don’t flip out!! Some of the athletes and their families have been working with Rubio/Sailer for years. Just because they know some of the athletes immediately doesn’t mean they aren’t watching your kid. In fact, you just might hear them called by a nickname that will stick (ex. BaconHead, Oregon, MadDawg). Your son may get a “big daddy” thrown his way. This happens because they ARE noticing your kid, and while in that moment they may not use your athlete’s full name, they use these kinds of nicknames because that’s one of the ways they remember the athletes. You may also notice that your athlete is being photographed and videoed…a lot. Relax, Rubio and Sailer are noticing your son from the moment you walk up to the registration table until the moment you leave that afternoon (likely dragging, tired, a little overwhelmed by all the information you’ve been given, and definitely excited and motivated for the future).

           -Remember the big fish/small pond example? This is when you’ll probably realize that while your kid is talented, so are many other kids. Again, relax. At the end of the day, your son has just learned from the best, trained with the best, and been evaluated by the best. Once rankings/evaluations are posted, your athlete is going to have his strengths highlighted while also given constructive criticism. This part of the process ideally will encourage, motivate, and drive your son to put what he has learned to good use if he hasn’t already. Rubio has an excellent blog that explains how his rankings are done, so, again, go to the website, click on Rubio’s blog and search for how his rankings/evaluations are done. It’s fair, honest, and really quite easy to understand.

          -Be patient. Believe me when I say I understand, patience is not one of my virtues. However, Rubio and Sailer will tell the athletes and parents a date their rankings will come out. If you aren’t already, you and your athlete should follow, friend, like, etc. Sailer and Rubio on all social media sources. They will let everyone know via their blogs and social media that the rankings are up. 

     -Get familiar with social media- like yesterday. You will hear it, read it, and maybe wake up repeating it: Be sure your athlete is being appropriate when using social media. Colleges are watching and noting EVERYTHING your athlete is doing if they are a potential recruit. Think of it like Santa Claus (you better watch out…he knows when you’ve been bad or good so be good for goodness sake)- he’s everywhere! Does your kid want to play ball or lose a spot on a team over a retweet? If you don’t know what a retweet is, figure it out right now. 

How often should my son attend a Rubio/Sailer camp? Isn’t once enough? What about Vegas?

     1. I am a parent that looks for a really good reason to do something, I evaluate its worth as well as the sacrifice needed to obtain a goal. My son that I’ve referenced here has three siblings, so a great deal of thought has to go into these decisions. The following are my thoughts as a parent on this subject:

          -When preparing to have our son, my husband and I put a great deal of time and effort into being sure he would have the things he needed to thrive. While my husband (as a new dad) was awesome at helping, and he could change a diaper, the first few weeks of diaper changes were pretty comical. Sure, our son had a diaper on, but with practice he had a diaper on that didn’t fall off when we picked him up. Another example would be when our son got his learner’s permit to drive. He was very diligent about safety, and could get us from point A to B. But with practice, he stopped using the brake like an on/off switch. The point is, your athlete will learn great things at one camp, but if his desire is to be the best he can be or to play football at the next level, giving him more opportunities to fine tune his skills is imperative. Yes, attend more than one camp. 

          -While things like form, speed, accuracy, and consistency are themes that remain unchanged at each camp, I can say with certainty that my son has learned something new each time he’s attended a Rubio/Sailer camp. That could mean learning a new drill all the way to walking up to register by himself and displaying the confidence he is building in himself. The best analogy I can think of for this part of the process is much like when one learns to drive a car with a manual transmission. There’s that really fine, smooth moment you let off the clutch and press the gas pedal. In the beginning, most of us had those “herky, jerky” moments and had to restart, or have heard a parent yell “you’re grinding the gears.” If you only attend one camp, it’s probable that you and your athlete will approach most of the day together. If you attend a second camp, and you nudge your son to handle things himself, depending on the kid, it’s going to be somewhat “herky, jerky.” The more opportunities to practice and fine tune skills on and off the field, the smoother the transition will be for your son to become a confident and independent individual in a very positive way.

     2. Vegas. If I could go back in time, I would have gotten my son to this event sooner. It’s honestly not something one can explain, it’s the experience itself. You will hear Sailer and Rubio say go more than once. ABSOLUTELY! The first time you and your son attend this event, it’s like the first day of high school as a freshman. Most of the time is spent figuring everything out (unless your son is a seasoned world traveler that never gets jet lag and is intimidated by nothing). If you’ve ever seen the movie “Hoosiers” (your son probably has not, but hopefully you saw it back in the day), there is a scene where the team makes it to the BIG championship game. They all walk in the arena looking like a bunch of deer in headlights. The coach has them measure the court, and so on. This is much like that first trip to Vegas. Your son will realize the distance to the target hasn’t changed, Sailer and Rubio haven’t changed, and get more comfortable with what comes along with traveling, navigating this mega event, etc. 

Is it (the camps) really worth it?

     1. The easy, quick answer: YES!

     2. The training experience offered by Chris Sailer and Chris Rubio truly is worth it, and here is why:

          -If we are talking dollars and cents, as well as probability and statistics, then it’s a no-brainer. Add up what you would spend on the camps your son attends in a given year (everything- travel, food, hotel, camp, etc.). Nope, it’s not cheap. Now add up the cost of a four year education (and even pick a school with a lesser tuition, but add in staying on campus, a meal plan, transportation of some sort, etc.). You likely have just seen in black and white how beneficial this can be.

          -Do some research. Look at the options out there. It will quickly become clear NO OTHER CAMP offers the same degree of exposure, education, and instruction, AND educates/involves the parent/guardian (maximizing your athlete’s potential by giving him the tools to work hard and smart after camp is over). This is the real deal. 

          -What your son will take away from the Sailer/Rubio camp experience is priceless on several levels. First, this is my son’s goal, his dream- not mine, not my husband’s- his. If this is your athlete’s passion, you will see great things; if it’s your dream and not your kid’s you’re doing it wrong- stop. Second, this is an awesome opportunity for your son to learn responsibility, confidence, and independence BEFORE he steps out into this big ole world on his own. If my son chose to never pick up a football again, what he has learned and gained is more than we could teach him on our own as parents, and that alone makes every bit worth it. Finally, the day I stood back with my husband and watched our son walk up to a college’s special teams coordinator, shake his hand, look him in the eye and have a conversation with him on his own, I knew we were on the right track.

I cannot stress enough how essential the website (www.chrissailerkicking.com) is. Hopefully you’ve gained some insight and can relax and enjoy this awesome time with your athlete. It’s been one of the best decisions we have ever made.

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Consider Which Parent to Take With You On Trips

Yup, you read that correctly. An athlete should be very careful when going on an official (school pays for the trip and you only get five of them) or an unofficial (athlete/parents pay for the trip and you can take as many as you’d like) visit when deciding who goes with them.

Let me break it down for you….

If you are going to a school as a football recruit and aren’t exactly ideal size, you might want to leave your 5 foot tall mother at home. The mom’s height will spook the coach since they will think “Oh man, this kid is done growing.

On the other hand, if you are undersized and your dad is a giant, definitely bring him since the coach would think “Ok, kid doesn’t pass the eyeball test right now, but he has the same genes so he will get there in some time

Remember, coaches will already know what you can do through my rankings and by speaking with me. But, they will like to see how you pass the eyeball test, so don’t give them negatives to think about when recruiting you.

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Chris-Rubio-2Rubio Long Snapping is, by far, the biggest and best resource for Long Snappers in the country. Offering the best instruction and most exposure in the world. Rubio Long Snapping can help you to become the best snapper you can be!

In just 12 years,  Chris Rubio, President and Owner of Rubio Long Snapping, has become the #1 Long Snapping instructor in the country and the go-to man when a college coach needs a Long Snapper. Colleges from across the country rely on “Rubio’s” word day in and day out on who the best Long Snappers are in the country. Rubio Long Snapping has assisted in over 300 Long Snappers earning FULL SCHOLARSHIPS to major colleges and universities just for Long Snapping and many into the NFL as well.

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ASK RUBIO – Off-Season Visits, Coach vs Mom, Is Senior Year Too Late?

Dear Rubio….

Hi Rubio. I wanted to take an unofficial visit this year but with my dad’s work schedule and my football schedule I couldn’t find the time to schedule one. I want to know if there is anyway to take a visit once football is out of season and how does one go about doing this?
-Big Headed Snapper

Big Headed Snapper….
The same exact way you would before….just call the football office and tell them you would like to visit. Need a refresher on how to get an UNOFFICIAL recruiting trip? Click HERE
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Dear Rubio….

Ever since off season my coach has put me on the task to gain more weight. He has his own little  weight gain regiment, which consist of PB & J sandwiches , more portions during meals, and whole milk. I love it, iv gained about 6 or 7 pounds. My lifts have gone up, everything is going great. My mom does not love it. Last night she pointed at out that I look a little pudgy. She has been against this regiment since day one, she offered me an alternative. She would make me her own little diet for me, that would consist of more sleep, vitamins and other hocus pocus Doctor stuff that she says will help me gain weight, and a smaller waistline. What should I do?
-Snapper Swag

Snapper Swag…
Since it is working, I would continue with what your coach has going for you….BUT…..I would also listen to your mother, throw in some vitamins and increase your cardio to trim off the baby fat. You don’t want to look sloppy. Like I always say, put on some really tight white underwear and look at yourself in the mirror. If you feel like you want to throw up while looking at yourself, you might want to adjust the ol’ eating and training regimen.
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Dear Rubio….

I have just finished my junior season of high school football and have dreams of playing college ball, as a long snapper. I picked up the craft 3/4 into the season and fell in love with it and have used videos from you and other coaches as my own source of coaching. Will the fact that I have only done the position for a few months affect how different colleges of different levels recruit me? Is the senior season too late? Could going to only two camps help me with exposure assuming I perform well? ( money is a little tight at the moment)
-AspiringSnapper

AspiringSnapper….
It might have a bit of an impact on your recruiting but not much. They want to know what you are doing now, not ten years ago. I have had several Long Snappers get full rides that never snapped in a high school game for one reason or another. I would highly recommend to get you the right exposure and not just smoke and mirrors. The senior season is in NO way too late. Read THIS blog on the waves of recruiting.
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 Remember, if you would like to ASK RUBIO a question on any topic, just go ahead and send your question(s) to Rubio@RubioLongSnapping.com with the subject line: ASK RUBIO.

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8 Things Every Parent Can do to Help with Recruiting

Follow these easy steps to make your son and/or daughter a more recruitable athlete…

 

  1. Do NOT overstep your bounds. If I have said it once, I have said it a hundred times….the coach will be recruiting your son and/or daughter, NOT you.
  2. Be very supportive of your son and/or daughter. I know they are going through their teenage years and this one can be tough, but remember, you were once a teenager (even if they don’t acknowledge) and times can be tough.
  3. Make sure your son and/or daughter will actually have a chance to go to college. There are tons of hoops to jump through nowadays, and you want to make sure your child has them all covered.
  4. Create a nice, clean highlight tape that is available on YouTube. Remember, you do NOT have to be an award winning director to create a great video.
  5. Review possible questions that a coach might ask your son and/or daughter. Role play if you will. Make sure your child speaks clearly, slowly and is looking you in the eyes.
  6. Do research on schools and try as hard as you can to take some trips to the schools on NON sports days. Sure, every school looks amazing on game day, but that is not reality. It will only look like that about six weekends per year. Go to the campus on a Tuesday, see what is really like. Go during different seasons so you can truthfully understand the different weather the area might have.
  7. Be sure your son is getting the right type of exposure from the right people. Just because someone tells you something, doesn’t mean it is true. Ask around, ask other parents. Do your homework.
  8. Allow your kid to be on social media, but make sure they know you are monitoring them. Nothing personal to the athletes, but they are young and they are dumb (sorry, it’s true and the reason I know it’s true is because every single adult was also, you guessed it, young AND dumb once as well) and they will make mistakes. The only difference is that when an adult used to be young and dumb, only the people that saw them do something ignorant knew about it. Now, with the onslaught of social media, the world can know about it in less than a second. Even saying that, there are so many benefits to social media for them to be off of it (one of the first questions a coach will ask me, “is the kid on Facebook? Have him friend me so I can contact him”).

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Chris-Rubio-2Rubio Long Snapping is, by far, the biggest and best resource for Long Snappers in the country. Offering the best instruction and most exposure in the world. Rubio Long Snapping can help you to become the best snapper you can be!

In just 12 years, Chris Rubio, President and Owner of Rubio Long Snapping, has become the #1 Long Snapping instructor in the country and the go-to man when a college coach needs a Long Snapper. Colleges from across the country rely on “Rubio’s” word day in and day out on who the best Long Snappers are in the country. Rubio Long Snapping has assisted in over 300 Long Snappers earning FULL SCHOLARSHIPS to major colleges and universities just for Long Snapping and many into the NFL as well.

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Are You Helping or Hindering Your Athlete?

There is a very simple, tiny little factor that can make a terrific athlete (Long Snapper in this case) an absolute disaster. It isn’t something you can touch, buy or even give to someone. It is a feeling and it is often brought about by a person that loves the athlete the most. The feeling is TENSION and the person(s) often inflicting it are the PARENTS.

Athletes can be tense from self inflicted pressure (rarely) or, more often than not, from an outside source (parent/guardian).

An athlete that is working, truly working (camps, lessons, doing drills on their own, watching film, etc) to become the best KNOWS what rides with each “step” they take in life. They know the implications, they know the ramifications and they know the factors that will enable them to reach their goals within their sport. They got it. Trust me, they know. They do need a little motivation now and again (notice I say motivation which means being positive and not negative) but they do not need to be harassed.

When a parent rides an athlete and nags them, they will make them tense. Very tense. Being tense is not the same as pressure. Pressure is something that every athlete, and person, will have to deal with in life. It is a given. Whether it is a game winning snap, a public speech, a deadline or making your paycheck stretch, you will experience some sort of pressure….so why would you want to add on to that pressure for your son/daughter with tension?

So, how do you know if your athlete is tense? How do you know if your athlete is really into his/her sport and doing it because THEY want to or because YOU want them to? Here are the two biggest ways I have noticed…..
1. Sit back and see who approaches who to get some practice in to get better. Are you asking THEM to get some work in or are they asking YOU? If you find yourself pressing the issue, you might want to pull back a bit. Odds are they are doing it for you, are stressed out and are filled with tension.
2. After each particular key play (a snap in this case) do they focus on what they are doing or do the immediately look up to see your reaction? If an athlete tends to look up immediately for approval from a parent, they are usually running very tense and will never be fully happy or succeed to their fullest extent.

So, what should you (a parent) do? Watch your kid in sports, let them see you NODDING in approval, let them hear you giving them PRAISE and being POSITIVE.

Or don’t.

The choice is yours.

I have been working with top athletes for over a decade and I have NEVER seen one perform better when they are tense. If you simply don’t have the ability to nod (side note: you seriously might want to work on that) I recommend just staying back a bit. Definitely come and support your child but just keep a good distance. Instead of watching from the sideline, watch from the top of the bleachers. Don’t even let your kid know where you are sitting. Spread out. You’ll still be able to see what is happening and relay back to them what you saw.

An athlete will ALWAYS excel at a higher level when they are confident and relaxed. There is enough pressure on them at the camps, competitions, events and games without someone else adding tension to the equation. Be supportive, not suffocating and watch the results skyrocket. No matter how independent a non-adult athlete feels they are,  they will always follow your lead and feed off of you.  Be worth following.

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Chris-Rubio-2Rubio Long Snapping is, by far, the biggest and best resource for Long Snappers in the country. Offering the best instruction and most exposure in the world. Rubio Long Snapping can help you to become the best snapper you can be!

In just 12 years, Chris Rubio, President and Owner of Rubio Long Snapping, has become the #1 Long Snapping instructor in the country and the go-to man when a college coach needs a Long Snapper. Colleges from across the country rely on “Rubio’s” word day in and day out on who the best Long Snappers are in the country. Rubio Long Snapping has assisted in over 300 Long Snappers earning FULL SCHOLARSHIPS to major colleges and universities just for Long Snapping and many into the NFL as well.

 

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The Parent Trap….

How much should parents be involved with their son and his Long Snapping career is a very touchy issue and I am going to tread lightly. A lot of it depends on the relationship between the kid and the parent. If you are laughing right now as a parent or the Long Snapper and asking, “What relationship?” let me reassure you of this….

For the Long Snappers – your parents actually were teenagers at one point in their life. They actually have gone through some of the same things you have encountered. True, it may not have been Long Snapping, but other situations can correlate to give them a very similar experience. Your parent(s) just want to be treated with respect and like an adult.

For the Parents – your kid(s) will get through this. It/They can be trying, but it is what it is. Like I always say, you have one teenager and I have hundreds. I see a a lot of teenagers per year. I see them all over the country and they are all pretty similar. Your kid(s) just want to be treated with respect and like an adult.

As for how a parent should handle the issue of dealing with college coaches, here is the best way to think about it so you can relate…..

When you were dating your future husband/wife, did you want to go out with their parents or with them?

You wanted to go out with your date and not their parents. Same with the coaches. They want to deal with the Long Snapper and not you. Sure you can assist (similar to a parent giving their kid a couple bucks for a date or advising them of a solid restaurant to go to) but let the Long Snapper take the lead. They speak to coaches, not you. The coach will be with the kid for the next four years and need to see their personality and not yours. Trust me when I tell you, an overbearing parent can crush a young man’s chances with a school.

Hope this helps.

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Chris-Rubio-2Rubio Long Snapping is, by far, the biggest and best resource for Long Snappers in the country. Offering the best instruction and most exposure in the world. Rubio Long Snapping can help you to become the best snapper you can be!

In just 12 years, Chris Rubio, President and Owner of Rubio Long Snapping, has become the #1 Long Snapping instructor in the country and the go-to man when a college coach needs a Long Snapper. Colleges from across the country rely on “Rubio’s” word day in and day out on who the best Long Snappers are in the country. Rubio Long Snapping has assisted in over 300 Long Snappers earning FULL SCHOLARSHIPS to major colleges and universities just for Long Snapping and many into the NFL as well.

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Who Makes Up Rubio?

How did I get to be me? Who influences me? Who is a part of my everyday life? Kind of odd questions but ones that I think would make me seem a little bit more open to many of you. I am going to open up to you and give you bit of insight on my family. This blog is going to introduce just a couple of these characters to you. I choose to use the word characters instead of people because that is what these people are….characters.
Jolie and yours truly

Jolie – My wife. She deserves an entire blog (or better yet book) but all I am going to do is show you a picture of the two of us and let your minds go crazy. I may, or may not, come back to her and this story (easily one of the best you will ever hear) later. Trust me, it is amazing.  Here is your picture:

Cruz

Cruz – My oldest son. Full of personality. Excellent athlete. Easiest way to explain him is if you watch the show Modern Family, Cruz is Manny. No doubt. Cruz has the personality of a 25 year old gigolo. I keep telling him he is nine.

Alec

 

Alec – Eight year old son who is an artistic genius, extremely bright, kind and talks louder than anyone I have ever heard. It is almost shocking. He might be an off-spring of Will Ferrell’s character Jacob Silj from Saturday Night Live. I can’t wait until he can work Vegas for me simply to call out names.

The Triplets – Mother (Deb), Aunt Donna and Aunt Leslie

They actually aren’t triplets, or so they say. They are sisters that act and look identical. They wear black EVERY SINGLE DAY of the year. Christmas..check. Weddings…check. Baptisms…check. Funerals…..kidding? They love them. It is like the SuperBowl since they are finally in style. Quick run down:

My mother (Deb), Aunt Leslie and Aunt Donna on Easter Sunday.
The Debster

Mother (Deb) – Often called Deb because, for some reason, she does not respond to mom. I could say mom all day and she wouldn’t hear it one time. I say Deb and she is all of a sudden like the dog from the movie Up when he smells a squirrel. She is the leader of the triplets. She just had one of her knees replaced. Still limps on it. Think she forgot she replaced it. She wears black.

Aunt Donna

Aunt Donna – Easily the nicest person you will ever meet. She won’t say a bad thing about anyone. Literally, someone could be talking about the devil and Aunt Donna would say, “Um, well, he um, at least he looks good in red.” A little absent minded at times (at times = 23 hours and 59 seconds of the day)….adds to her charm but I guarantee you will never, ever find a nicer person. She wears black.

Aunt Leslie

Aunt Leslie – The funniest of the three. If you ever get a chance to hear her tell a story, usually making fun of the other triplets, you will die laughing. Always loyal. Hilarious. According to her, she has never had a good day….in her entire life. She wears black.

Big Queen and yours truly

Barb (The Big Queen) – Mother-in-Law. Great listener. Amazing person. Loves to hear a good story and is all about the pulse of the people. Not sure how, but she can watch 15 TV shows per day, TiVo another 20 and watch those too. She pretty much defies science and  can bend time.

The Onion. Given no face option.

Dale (The Onion) – Father-in-Law. Nickname is because he has so many layers (well done Marcus J). Doesn’t speak to anyone he doesn’t like….please note: doesn’t talk much:) Absolutely hilarious when he does speak. Shockingly poignant. Doesn’t use real names. Only nicknames. I can’t tell you mine unless you are over 17. I embrace.

Ruth (The Gypsy) – Grandmother-in-law. Nice as can be. Barb’s mother so she can also defy science. Therefore, she is in her mid 80’s but is able to act and looks like she is mid 50’s. Changes outfits on the hour for some reason (jacket you see in photo on the right was immediately taken off and replaced with blue top for a group shot). Has a knack for predicting the predictable. For instance, when we told her Jolie was pregnant, she had no doubt, through her powers, that it would be a boy….or a girl. True story.

Macaw, her cane & Cruz


Macaw
– My grandmother. She is 94. I think. She thinks. Anytime you ask her she bumps it  up simply to be the oldest person around. She hates when she is not the oldest. I always try to point out someone that looks older and tell her they are older (I don’t even know the person, just do it to keep her fired up). She then proceeds to hit me with her cane….which she really doesn’t need and only uses it for abusing her grandson…me:) Yet again, I embrace since hitting me with it keeps her spry.

That is all I will do right now. I can do friends next time. The characters go on and on and on…..

Hope you have a little better feel of who I am

 

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